Puppy Education

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Puppy Education

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Vaccinations

The range of vaccines available includes: Rabies, DHPP (distemper, adenovirus, parvovirus, and parainfluenza), Leptospirosis, Lyme, Influenza, Rattlesnake, and Kennel Cough. Texas requires all cats and dogs to be vaccinated for rabies starting at 12 weeks of age. DHPP is considered a core vaccination for all dogs since it prevents common and fatal infections, while other vaccine recommendations depend on your family’s lifestyle. Your veterinarian will assess the relative risks based on your circumstances and advise you accordingly.

Booster Vaccines for Puppies
Newborn animals have not yet had a change to make their own immunity so they need protection against infections present in their environment. They receive this immunity from their mother. It declines steadily over the first few weeks of life and is largely gone by 12 weeks of age. The rate of decline is variable depending on many factors. Without complicated blood testing, it is impossible to know when a pup has lost the immunity it gets from its mother. An early decline in maternal immunity can leave it susceptible to infection but a strong maternal antibody can actually interfere with early vaccinations. Also, particularly with killed vaccines, the first dose is a ‘priming’ dose, and the second is needed to boost the response to a higher, longer-lasting level of immunity.

Microchipping Your Dog

The microchip is a tiny computer chip, about the size of a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number. Once an animal is injected with a chip, it can be identified throughout its life. A special scanner is used to send a radio signal to the chip to read the identification number. The number is displayed on the scanner, and the person reading the scanner can contact a national registry to find out who the pet belongs to.

The microchips are enclosed in biocompatible glass and small enough to fit into a hypodermic needle, making injecting them as easy as giving a vaccine.

Microchips are permanent and can’t be lost, altered, or destroyed. Pet owners have been reunited with chipped pets that have been missing for years or that have traveled thousands of miles.

After your pet is chipped, you will be given information about how to contact the national registry to update your information. Remember to do this whenever you change your address or phone number.

Microchipping Your Dog

The microchip is a tiny computer chip, about the size of a grain of rice, programmed with an identification number. Once an animal is injected with a chip, it can be identified throughout its life. A special scanner is used to send a radio signal to the chip to read the identification number. The number is displayed on the scanner, and the person reading the scanner can contact a national registry to find out who the pet belongs to.

The microchips are enclosed in biocompatible glass and small enough to fit into a hypodermic needle, making injecting them as easy as giving a vaccine.

Microchips are permanent and can’t be lost, altered, or destroyed. Pet owners have been reunited with chipped pets that have been missing for years or that have traveled thousands of miles.

After your pet is chipped, you will be given information about how to contact the national registry to update your information. Remember to do this whenever you change your address or phone number.

Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal condition caused by parasitic worms living in the arteries of the lungs and occasionally in the right side of the heart of dogs, cats and other species. Dogs and cats of any age or breed are susceptible to infection.

Heartworm disease has been reported in all 50 states. The map shows particularly endemic areas based on the number of cases reported by clinics.

Recently infected dogs may exhibit no signs of the disease, while heavily infected dogs may eventually show clinical signs, including a mild, persistent cough, reluctance to move or exercise, fatigue after only moderate exercise, reduced appetite and weight loss.

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Intestinal Parasites

Intestinal parasites are common in puppies. Puppies can become infected with parasites from their mother or through contaminated water, soil, or ingesting feces. The microscopic examination of a stool sample will usually help us to determine the presence of intestinal parasites. Even if we do not get a stool sample we recommend the use of a deworming product that is safe and effective against several of the common worms of the dog. It is important that it be repeated because the deworming medication only kills the adult worms. Within 3-4 weeks, the larval stages will become adults and need to be treated. Puppies with moderate to severe infestations can become malnourished and sick from the parasites. Additionally, some of these internal parasites (roundworms, hookworms, giardia) can be transmitted to humans.

Intestinal Parasites

Intestinal parasites are common in puppies. Puppies can become infected with parasites from their mother or through contaminated water, soil, or ingesting feces. The microscopic examination of a stool sample will usually help us to determine the presence of intestinal parasites. Even if we do not get a stool sample we recommend the use of a deworming product that is safe and effective against several of the common worms of the dog. It is important that it be repeated because the deworming medication only kills the adult worms. Within 3-4 weeks, the larval stages will become adults and need to be treated. Puppies with moderate to severe infestations can become malnourished and sick from the parasites. Additionally, some of these internal parasites (roundworms, hookworms, giardia) can be transmitted to humans.

Resources

Puppy Socialization
Socialization Video
Canine Body Language
Canine Body Language Video
Leash Walking
Playing With Your Pup
Interacting With Your Pup
Potty Training Your Pup
Crate Training Your Pup
Clicker training your puppy
A Guide to Spaying and Neutering